By | November 26, 2014

If the Ferguson situation conveys a message, it’s that issues of race are rarely resolved in the heat of the moment. To slow down and eventually quell the epidemic of young African American men dying in police-involved incidents and in our own communities, we must employ what we know works to dismantle racism and disparate outcomes—systems thinking. It is not enough to say that the criminal justice system is broken or that we need more community policing. To move this country forward, we must examine how education, housing, employment, health care access, and the justice system interact to perpetuate racism and poverty.  

We also need to embrace the scientific research on race—including research on implicit bias and social cognition. Statements by individuals, including Darren Wilson, that they “do not see color” or that race does not affect their decision-making are belied by research. We all have biases, and until law enforcement agencies recognize that truth and implement necessary training and support, appropriate debiasing cannot and will not be incorporated into policing policies and individual police actions and, in turn, we will continue to run in circles. 

What you can do to make a difference? 

  • If you work in the nonprofit advocacy or legal world, ask whether your organization operates in silos or whether your staff are working together to tackle issues using systems thinking approaches and employing a racial justice lens. 
  • If you work in the private sector and have a pro bono or foundation arm, ask whether the projects you fund address racial disparities and outcomes.
  • If you do vote, ask candidates—both national and especially local (sheriffs, county board presidents, mayors, city council) if they accept and embrace systems-thinking approaches between governmental departments and whether they are willing utilize implicit bias and social cognition principles in administrator and staff training, particularly for law enforcement.
  • If you don’t vote, start voting.

As an anti-poverty organization, the Shriver Center recognized that our own work was limited without a more explicit inclusion of racial justice issues. In 2014 we launched the Racial Justice Training Institute (RJTI), and we have worked with legal aid and nonprofit legal organizations across the country to continue and, for some, to begin the process of employing a racial justice lens in advocacy work. We know that the Wilson, Zimmerman, and many other cases will not be the last tragic incidents of their kind. But we will continue to support and work with our civil rights colleagues and community organizations to take a systems-thinking approach and employ implicit bias and social cognition research and techniques to properly understand the causes of problems and to learn how to solve them most effectively. And together, we will continue our march towards a better America.

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