Esquenazi decision interprets the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act

By David McMahon and Robert G. Levy

Companies doing business internationally no doubt have heard about the rise in claims brought by government agencies against companies and individuals under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). Our last article focused on ways expenses in defending against such claims — often substantially greater than the amount for which the claims are ultimately resolved — can be contained.

A new decision, U.S. v. Esquenazi, was issued by the 11th Circuit on May 16, 2014, that carefully examines the tests required to determine whether in a given situation the FCPA has, or has not, been violated. The decision, a rare one despite the burgeoning number of prosecutions under the FCPA, clarifies but yet does not simplify what the applicable criteria for prosecution and conviction are. Pertinent to the role of corporate counsel overseeing the defense of such investigations and prosecutions, the decision in fact demonstrates just how wide ranging and fact intensive such an investigation and prosecution might become.

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Originally published by InsideCounsel, July 15, 2014

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